Faculty of Clinical Informatics Webinars

The Faculty is hosting a series of webinars on topics of interest to our members, and to share approaches and experiences to help respond to the COVID-19 emergency.

Webinars can be attended live by members of the FCI. If you would like to register for one or more of the below webinars, please email info@fci.org.uk

All webinars will be put onto the Faculty YouTube Channel, so if you are not able to attend you can catch them there.  As webinars are held, links will be added to this webpage.  

We are keen to address topics of importance to members.  If you would like to suggest a topic for a webinar, please email info@fci.org.uk.

Upcoming Webinars:

  • 5th March, 12.30 - 1.30pm - Recruitment Webinar on applying to join the FCI

    • The webinar, as part of the current application period, will include short presentations from FCI members on why they joined the Faculty and their experiences so far, followed by a short workshop on filling out the application form. The session with then wrap up with a Q&A.


  • 10th March, 7 - 8pm - How to become a clinical informatician (with the FCI Early Careers Group)

    • This webinar, hosted by the FCI Early Careers Group, will focus on the different routes to becoming a clinical informatician. The panel will be made up of current FCI members from a range of professional backgrounds, discussing how they got into clinical informatics, what their role is like, how this compared to their expectations going in, and tips for those looking to develop their career in clinical informatics. This will be followed by a Q&A session.

  • 25th March, 7 - 8pm - The impact of COVID-19 on digital health in Australian primary care (Professor Michael Kidd, Deputy Chief Medical Officer and Principal Medical Advisor with the Australian Government Department of Health)

    • The Faculty is very fortunate to have Professor Michael Kidd, Deputy Chief Medical Officer and Principal Medical Advisor with the Australian Government Department of Health, provide an update on the Australian response to the COVID19 pandemic, focusing on the use of data and the lessons learnt. There will be an opportunity for questions and answers.

Webinars are approved for CPD (1 point) in accordance with the current FCI CPD guidelines. 


Please see recordings of previous webinars below:

Putting the social back into sociotechnical: principles to support co-design of technology-supported health services

On 11th February 2021 the FCI held a webinar on co-design, presented by Dr Chrysanthi Papoutsi (Senior Researcher, Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford). 

The webinar was Chaired by Maggie Lay, Clinical Informatics Lead & Clinical Safety Officer at NHS South Central and West Commissioning Support Unit, and FCI Council member.

Summary

Co-design has the potential to drive user-oriented change in health informatics and service improvement and bring into focus sociotechnical aspects of clinical work and patient self-care. Yet, in many digital health projects co-design remains technology-oriented and firmly focused on optimising technical features, rather than engaging with social aspects of change.

Drawing on extensive fieldwork in 3 UK case studies, this talk will distinguish between mechanistic and complexity-informed approaches to co-designing in digital health. I will argue that co-design of technology-supported services (rather than just patient-facing technical components) needs to embrace a more open approach, departing from a predefined problem specification and largely fixed solution. Patients should be involved not just as prospective technology users, but in terms of their wider engagement with the service and their practices of self-care. Co-designing with healthcare staff also means taking into account their professional norms and values about what counts as good care; this is often less straightforward than assumed. In the talk I will present a number of guiding principles supporting co-design and ongoing adaptations of technology-supported health services, to improve their potential for successful implementation, spread and scaled-up.

Watch the video via YouTube:


Download the slides in PDF

The Chair and presenter of the webinar are responsible for the content and views expressed in the webinar.



GP Computing – the First Ten Years (with the BCS Primary Health Care Specialist Group)

To celebrate forty years since the foundation of the British Computer Society's Primary Health Care Specialist Group, and the publication of the Royal College of GPs seminal paper ‘Computers in Primary Care’, the BCS brought together a panel of experts who were closely involved in the early developments of medical computing. They spoke about the fun, the excitement, and the personalities of those heady days in general practice, as well as describing how and why we ended up with the primary care systems we have now.

The event was hosted by broadcaster and former GP Robert Treharne Jones, and included panellists Glyn Hayes, the President of the PHCSG; John Williams, FCI Council Member; Nick Booth, FCI Hon Treasurer; Ewan Davis, founder of AAH Meditel; Sheila Teasdale, the former director of PRIMIS; David Stables, co-founder of EMIS; nurse practitioner Cheryl Cowley; Ian Herbert, Consultant in Health Informatics and Mike Bainbridge, former Clinical Architect to Connecting for Health.

Watch the video via YouTube:


Download the webinar chat 

The Chair and panellists are responsible for the content and views expressed in the webinar.


The Great North Care Record – Lessons of NPfIT Learned AND Applied

On 28th January, the FCI hosted a webinar with Professor Joe McDonald (FCI Council member, Medical Director at Sleepstation, CCIO at CNTW NHS Trust) discussing his work as founding Director of the Great North Care Record. The webinar was Chaired by Dermot O'Riordan, Chief Clinical Information Officer at West Suffolk NHS FT, and FCI Council Member.

Summary:

Applying the hard earned lessons of the National Programme for IT, The Great North Care Record team developed a successful, clinically led regional integrated care record project which achieved 100% adoption by all local GPs and Trusts serving 3.6 million citizens on a shoestring budget which is now used 250, 000 times a month to deliver better safer care to patients. As proponents of the Zone of Uncomfortable Debate approach to health IT, no question is off limits in this webinar.

Watch the video via YouTube:


The Chair and presenter of the webinar are responsible for the content and views expressed in the webinar.


An Introduction to Machine Learning and Healthcare AI

On 19th January 2021, the Faculty of Clinical Informatics held an introductory webinar on Machine Learning as a joint session between the FCI Artificial Intelligence and Early Careers Special Interest Groups. The session was presented by Dr Kieran Zucker and Chaired by Professor Jeremy Wyatt.

Artificial intelligence and machine learning technologies have received growing attention over the past decade. The combination of improvements in computer power and refinement of methods have resulted in a number of high profile success stories. There is growing interest in how these approaches can be applied in healthcare delivery, with an ever increasing number of tools being developed over time. Despite plans for wide scale adoption, many working in healthcare know little about machine learning and artificial intelligence. This talk will provide a basic introduction to machine learning and artificial intelligence and give a high level overview of how it works. Using a number of real world examples, focus will be given to not only the potential of machine learning in healthcare, but also some of the many pitfalls that could lead to disastrous consequences.

 Watch the video via YouTube: 



Download the slides in PDF 

The Chair and presenter of the webinar are responsible for the content and views expressed in the webinar.


Why we must share knowledge more to allow digital transformation

To find solutions in digital transformation we need to be very clear about the problem we’re trying to solve. Solutioning has two components, a human, organisational component and a technology component. A solution requires an action plan, which involves both of these components in a balanced way. Although there are many excellent, deep conversations happening around data science for the technology component, we aren’t hearing the holistic conversations around solutioning for the human component, and that is holding people back. The digital mindset requires a hunger for collaboration and a transparency for sharing everything that we do.

Ben Bridgewater is CEO at the Health Innovation Manchester, an Academic Health Sciences Network. In this webinar, chaired by Sue Lacey Bryant, National Lead for NHS Library and Knowledge Services, Directorate of Innovation and Transformation at Health Education England, we’ll explore the enablers and barriers to sharing know-how and why it holds the key to achieving digital transformation in order to improve outcomes for patients. Ben will discuss the importance of embedding digital within innovation and transformation and the need to not just to focus on the technology itself, but also the customer experience, the people impacted by the innovation, the process and the cultural changes needed to embed and realise the benefits. Approaching digital innovation in this way means we can make progress much quicker, in a matter of weeks not months in some cases, and ensure that the transformational work is embedded fully and can provide measurable and lasting benefits both during the immediate pandemic and beyond.

Watch the video via YouTube:


The Chair and presenter of the webinar are responsible for the content and views expressed in the webinar.


Diagnosis Recording Special Interest Group Webinar

On 26th November 2020, the FCI held a webinar and meeting of the Diagnosis Recording Special Interest Group (SIG). This meeting was Chaired by Dr Anoop Shah (Clinical Lecturer, UCL Institute of Health Informatics, THIS Institute Postdoctoral Fellow, Fellow of the FCI) & Maggie Lay (FCI Council Member, Clinical Safety Officer & Clinical Informatics Lead at South Central and West CSU).

The Faculty of Clinical Informatics (FCI) set up the Diagnosis Recording Special Interest Group (SIG) in 2019 to try to improve the recording of problems and diagnoses in health records, in order to improve patient care. This will require improvements to systems as well as the way health professionals use them.

For medical diagnoses, many of the issues have already been raised in a previous project by the Professional Record Standards Body and the Royal College of Physicians. We aim to build on this and produce a position paper with recommendations for improving electronic health record systems. 

However, whilst there may be a broad agreement about what the term “diagnosis” means between primary and secondary medical care, there is considerable difference in how the term “problem” is used in each medical record. In the wider patient and health and care context, the differences in terminology use make it arguably unsafe to transliterate those terms to electronic records. We propose to have a broader discussion to develop a common lexicon around diagnoses and problems, and a better understanding of the information needs of different professional groups.

Watch the video via YouTube:   



Download the slides in PDF

The Chairs of the webinar is responsible for the content and views expressed in the webinar.


Webinar on the FCI Core Competency Framework

On 29th October 2020, the Faculty of Clinical Informatics held a webinar to discuss their Core Competency Framework for Clinical Informaticians.

This session was presented by Dr Alan Hassey (GP, Chair of the FCI Education & Standards Committee and Council Member) & Prof Georgina Moulton (Professor of BioHealth Informatics and Education at The University of Manchester), who developed the Core Competency Framework for the FCI.

Summary:

The vast scope and range of activities covered by clinical informatics sometimes makes it hard to provide a short and pithy description of what the Faculty of Clinical Informatics (FCI) does and who we are. The Core Competencies Project (CCP) addresses this by identifying the core competencies for an individual to be recognised as a professional clinical informatician. 

The Faculty of Clinical Informatics has been supported in this work by Health Education England’s Digital Readiness (DR) programme and by Prof. Georgina Moulton at the University of Manchester.

Watch the video via YouTube:   



Download the slides in PDF


The Chair of the webinar is responsible for the content and views expressed in the webinar.


FCI Clinical Safety SIG & National CSO Meeting: Experiences of writing-up a Clinical Safety Case Report - more than the sum of its parts?

On 22nd October 2020, the Faculty of Clinical Informatics held the third meeting of their Clinical Safety Special Interest Group (SIG), in collaboration with the NHS National Clinical Safety Officer Group, entitled 'Experiences of writing-up a Clinical Safety Case Report - more than the sum of its parts?'

The meeting was Chaired by Sebastian Alexander (Founding Fellow of the FCI, NHS Digital, Safety, SME Apps Programme), and presented by Clive Tomsett (Clinical Safety Officer, Director of Mable & Florence Ltd. Previous Safety Officer roles with Cerner, Accenture, BT, Fujitsu and NPSA) and Maggie Lay (FCI Council Member, Clinical Safety Officer & Clinical Informatics Lead at South Central and West CSU)

The aim of the meeting was a 'show and tell' using a real-world clinical safety use case for virtual consultation, to reflect on what could be improved, and to discuss the significance of a safety case to distil and communicate key mitigations and actions.

Watch the video via YouTube:   



Download Clive's slides in PDF

Download Maggie's slides in PDF

Download the example safety case

The Chair of the webinar is responsible for the content and views expressed in the webinar.


OpenSAFELY: how we built a secure analytics platform for 23 million patients' EHR data in 5 weeks during Covid-19

On 14th October 2020, the Faculty of Clinical Informatics held a webinar on OpenSAFELY, presented by Ben Goldacre & Chaired by Amir Mehrkar.

OpenSAFELY is a new highly secure analytics platform for NHS patient data running on an unprecedented scale: 40% of the entire population's full pseudonymised electronic health records. Despite this scale it has been praised by privacy activists and produced its first analysis, now published in Nature, just 5 weeks after the project design was first speculatively discussed. Much of this is down to the open model of OpenSAFELY, driven by the highly productive open source software movement: all code is built collaboratively online, and shared openly for security review, scientific review, and efficient re-use. Ben Goldacre is a researcher, clinician, and the best selling author of Bad Science. In this talk he will describe how a socially-distanced team built OpenSAFELY, and what they learned about the technical, regulatory, and cultural barriers to delivering better use of data in the UK.

Find out more about OpenSAFELY.

Watch the video via YouTube:  



The presenters of the webinar are responsible for the content and views expressed in the webinar.


Integrating Best Practice in EHR systems, BMJ Best Practice

On 1st October, the Faculty of Clinical Informatics held a webinar with Health Education England & BMJ Best Practice on integrating Best Practice into Electronic Health Record systems.

This webinar was presented be Dr Chris Wroe from BMJ Best Practice and Lucy Reid, Deputy Head of Library and Knowledge Services in the Directorate of Innovation and Transformation, HEE. 

Funded by Health Education England, BMJ Best Practice is free to all NHS staff. Together we recognise the importance of integrating clinical content into the workflow. After a brief introduction to BMJ Best Practice, Dr Chris Wroe, BMJ’s Health Informatician will describe the different levels of integration we have achieved so far, from general links, to integration that takes advantage of SNOMED-CT. Interoperability and standards are key to making integration straightforward and we will discuss the standards we support now, and the newer standards that are emerging.  

Apologies for the slight sound/video issues in this recording.

 Watch the video via YouTube: 



Download the HEE slides in PDF

Download the BMJ slides in PDF

The presenters of the webinar are responsible for the content and views expressed in the webinar.

Modelling excess mortality across England during a national pandemic, Public Health England 

On 24th September 2020, the Faculty of Clinical Informatics held a webinar to present Public Health England's work on modelling excess mortality during the current pandemic. The presenters were Sharmani Barnard & Sebastian Fox from Public Health Data Science, Public Health England, and Paul Burton from PHE & the Population Health Sciences Institute, Newcastle University.

Modelling excess mortality during national mass mortality events differs substantively from the modelling of mortality for estimation of life expectancy. The requirement to track mortality rates in real time places influences how the deaths data should be collected and managed. In this presentation we will outline why it is important to model excess deaths, the data that can be used to estimate it at a national level (broken down into informative subpopulations), and the mathematical models that may be used. We will also outline some of the key challenges we faced which understandably arose from the need to work in real-time in a rapidly evolving environment on a high profile statistical problem. We believe the approach we developed could be used as an easily constructed platform that can rapidly be rolled out to start tracking any analogous event in the future. In addition, in combination with other approaches to excess mortality it can be used to help track and understand the evolution of local or national subsequent waves of both deaths due to Covid-19 and excess deaths unrelated to the virus. 

Watch the video via YouTube:



Download the Slides in PDF

The Chair of the webinar is responsible for the content and views expressed in the webinar.


"How to fix a national clinical safety issue...." - starting the conversation

On 10th September 2020, the Faculty of Clinical Informatics held a webinar to discuss the problems individual clinicians have with reporting and fixing issues with clinical systems across the NHS, and to discuss ideas for how the processes can be improved will be aired and discussed.

The panel was made up of:

  • Dr Marcus Baw - GP and Emergency Physician, Chair of the RCGP Health Informatics Group, FCI Fellow and open source developer

  • Dr Ian Thompson - Clinical Lead (Primary Care) in Digital Health and Care at The Scottish Government

  • Dr Lesley Kay - Consultant Rheumatologist at Newcastle Hospitals and Deputy Medical Director at the Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch

  • Emma Melhuish – Principal Informatics Specialist at NHS Digital

  • Neil Watson – Director of Pharmacy, Newcastle Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Watch the video via YouTube:



Download the slides in PDF

The Chair of the webinar is responsible for the content and views expressed in the webinar.


Integrating Electronic Health Records with Clinical Trials

On 26th August, the Faculty of Clinical Informatics held a webinar on the work being done at UCL Hospital to integrate EHR systems with clinical trials.

The webinar was presented by Dr Wai Keong Wong (Consultant Haematologist, University College London Hospitals) and Jay Kola (SNOMED CT Implementation Consultant, Medical informatician, Termlex founder), and Chaired by Hon Secretary of the Faculty Paul Campbell.

Watch the video via YouTube:



Download the slides in PDF


The presenters are responsible for the content and views expressed in the webinar.


AI Special Interest Group Webinar - What is “computable biomedical knowledge”, and why is it important?

Presenter: Prof Jeremy Wyatt DM FRCP, FCI Founding Fellow; emeritus professor of Digital Healthcare, University of Southampton; chair of FCI AI Special Interest Group & former chair, European Society for AI in Medicine.

AI has been around since before the 1956 Dartmouth workshop, and it was already clear then that several different forms of AI would be important, including machine learning of algorithms from data and symbolic representations for use in reasoning.  

This webinar focused on the second of these, symbolic representations or “computable knowledge”. Building on the work of the American Mobilising Computable Biomedical Knowledge (MCBK) activity and a recent MCBK workshop here supported by FCI, we explored:

  1. The evidence that knowledge-based decision support systems improve medical decisions

  2. The definition of computable, as opposed to human readable, knowledge

  3. How such knowledge is already used in a wide range of software tools in healthcare

  4. Current challenges around acquiring computable knowledge

  5. The MCBK vision for how a global library of computable knowledge objects could address some of these challenges

  6. Some technical and other barriers that need to be overcome to realise this vision

This webinar should be of interest to anyone who is concerned about improving clinical decisions and quality improvement in healthcare.

Watch the video via YouTube:


Download the slides in PDF


The Chair of the webinar is responsible for the content and views expressed in the webinar. 


Clinical Safety Special Interest Group Webinar - Medical Devices

On 16th July, the Faculty of Clinical Informatics held the second meeting of our Clinical Safety Special Interest Group (SIG), in collaboration with the NHS National Clinical Safety Officer Group.

The meeting focused on Medical Devices, with an update on the recent Medical Device Regulations from guest speaker David Grainger (Technical Lead Software, AI and MRI from the MHRA). This was followed by a Q&A session with David and rounded out with a discussion on the next steps for the SIG.

Watch the video via YouTube:


Download the slides in PDF

The Chair of the webinar is responsible for the content and views expressed in the webinar. 


Kent & Medway (placed based) approach for population health analytics

On 25th June 2020 we held a session on population health analytics, hosted by Dr Abraham George (Consultant in Public Health & Educational Supervisor at Kent County Council and a long-term Fellow of the Faculty).

The webinar focused on the data modelling and population health planning approach in Kent and Medway, including the Kent linked dataset (KERNEL) and links to the NIHR Applied Research Collaborations. It addressed the IG and joint control aspects and provided some worked examples focused on COVID19, including simulation modelling, hospital based intelligence and analysis of death registrations.

Speakers included:

  • Marc Farr – Chief Analytical Officer East Kent Hospitals Trust

  • Chris Farmer – Consultant Nephrologist EKUHFT & prof at University of Kent

  • David Whiting – Consultant in Public Health Medway Council (intelligence lead)

  • Peter Lacey – Director, Whole Systems Partnership

 Watch the video via YouTube:



Download the Slides in PDF

The Chair of the webinar is responsible for the content and views expressed in the webinar. 


Data Ethics and COVID-19

 On 7th May 2020, we held our fourth session to introduce the topic of data ethics and how this relates to uses (and reuses) of patient data. In particular it discussed some of the ethical considerations around new and emerging data practices relating to COVID-19. The discussion reflected on the relevance and implications of ethical considerations across all areas of clinical practice and offered guidance on ethical approaches to data use.

The session was Chaired by Nick Booth, Hon Treasurer at the Faculty of Clinical Informatics, and presented by Dr. Mhairi Aitken, Senior Research Associate at Newcastle University.

Watch the video via YouTube:


Download the slides in PDF

The Chair of the webinar is responsible for the content and views expressed in the webinar. 


Clinical Safety Special Interest Group Webinar – Assessment of Apps and Pathology Standards

This third webinar in the series functioned as the first meeting of the Faculty Clinical Safety Special Interest Group, and to discuss key clinical safety issues in light of COVID-19.

The webinar was hosted by Sebastian Alexander (Founding Fellow of the FCI, NHS Digital, Safety, SME Apps Programme) and the first part featured presentations on the NHS Digital Apps and Wearables Programme and Kryptowire app assessment.

The second part featured the following presentations:

Click the links to download PDFs of the slides.

Watch Part 1 via YouTube

Watch Part 2 via YouTube




Download the Q&A responses in PDF

The Chair of the webinar is responsible for the content and views expressed in the webinar. 



Coding for General Practice Webinar

This webinar explained the purpose of the FCI COVID-19 coding advice and list of concepts for general practice. 

The panel for the webinar included representation from across the UK to cover variations in coding systems in use. Panel members included John Williams (England), Ian Thompson (Scotland) and Julian Costello (Wales), together with Jeremy Rogers, Consultant Terminology Specialist, NHS Digital. The session was chaired by Nick Booth, Hon Treasurer at the Faculty of Clinical Informatics.

Watch the video via YouTube:


Download the slides in PDF

Download the Q&A responses in PDF 

The Chair of the webinar is responsible for the content and views expressed in the webinar. 


Virtual Clinics Webinar

This webinar was around the role of virtual clinics during the COVID-19 pandemic and was Chaired by Professor Angus Wallace, an FCI Founding Fellow. It focused on clinical use of virtual clinics, with presentations from an expert panel, followed by a Q & A.

  • Experience with a Shoulder TeleMedicine Clinic in Nottingham - Angus Wallace, Nottingham University Hospitals.

  • Launching a Coronavirus TeleMedicine Service covering Pakistan - Dr Suhail Chughtai, Orthopaedic Surgeon, Medico-Legal Examiner and founder of telehealth consulting firm Medical City Online

  • Experience with Virtual Clinics in Sweden and England - Tina Marshall, UK Country Manager for Visiba Care

  • From virtual hip and knee follow up in Cornwall to remote cancer care in Scotland - Dan Williams, Consultant in Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery at the Royal Cornwall Hospital & Duchy Hospital and co-founder of My Clinical Outcomes

Watch the video via YouTube:



The Chair of the webinar is responsible for the content and views expressed in the webinar.